Anzus Agreement

Although recent proposals for a free trade agreement (FTA) between Australia and the United States are still timid, they have both negative and positive effects. In particular, an agreement effectively excluding all of Australia`s other major trading partners from what would be considered a “trading bloc” between Australia and the US (or at least deliberately misalmitted) could send totally inappropriate signals to the region. In any case, it is remarkable that the free trade agreement under discussion can exclude the difficult sector of primary products. 18. In a spirit of strengthening defence cooperation, the two sides stressed their respective commitments to a binding bilateral agreement on export controls, which would grant Australia a waiver of most of the US ammunition licensing requirements imposed by the International Traffic in Arms Regulations. The Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (INS or INS Treaty) is the 1951 collective security agreement between Australia and New Zealand, independently of Australia and the United States, to cooperate in military affairs in the Pacific region, although the treaty is now considered a conflict worldwide. It foresees that an armed attack on one of the three parties would be dangerous for the others and that each side should act to deal with the common threat. It has set up a Committee of Foreign Ministers, which can meet for consultations. Under the agreements stemming from Article 2 of the Treaty, Australia enjoys preferential status for the purchase of military equipment from the United States, which means that Australia has continuous access instead of having to negotiate authorization on a case-by-case basis. Agreements with the United States “also provide for the supply of ammunition and equipment in the event of an emergency, which mitigates the need for large-scale storage by the ADF.” (31) Some have argued that this relationship between defence supply and logistics is a double-edged sword, with “access” being a euphemism for dependency. But no nation, other than the United States itself, and especially a nation of Australia`s size and population, can expect to be truly self-sufficient, especially if “the reality of modern warfare requires allied technology well.” (32) Even in their quest for autonomy, Australian governments have accepted that Australia depends on its alliance with the United States to provide the technical means to defend itself. . .

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